A Free-Market Energy Blog

Trump at 2019’s G20: Weakening the Global Climate Cartel

By Robert Bradley Jr. -- July 2, 2019

“I’m not looking to put our companies out of business [over CO2 regulation] …. We have the cleanest air we’ve ever had.”

“Wind doesn’t work for the most part without subsidy. The United States is paying tremendous amounts of subsidies for wind. I don’t like it, I don’t like it.”

– President Donald Trump, G-20 Summit, Osaka, Japan, June 28, 2019

Chalk up another small victory for the US effort to reset the global agenda on climate change. The anti-growth Malthusians have quite a foe in President Trump, and his forceful consistency just might put the global-government climate crusade out of its misery sooner than otherwise.

Trump refused to sign the G-20 declaration on climate change as written (see below), and he lobbied Saudi Arabia, Brazil, Australia, and Turkey to do likewise.

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Renewable Energy vs. Africa’s Renaissance

By Vijay Jayaraj -- July 1, 2019

Thirteen of the world’s 20 least electrified countries are in Africa. Around 630 million people live without access to electricity in sub-Saharan Africa.

“What will help Africa defeat energy poverty: glorified renewables or time-tested, dense, reliable conventional energies?”

The African energy renaissance never happened. Most of the continent is still in the dark and far behind the rest of the world in energy production.

Now, the challenges faced by Africa’s energy sector have only been complicated by European interests in climate policy-driven renewable energy.

What will help Africa defeat energy poverty: glorified renewables or time-tested, dense, reliable conventional energies?

African Energy Situation

Africans are very nearly 1/6th of the world’s people, but they consume just 1/30th of the world’s primary energy. Thirteen of the world’s 20 least electrified countries are in Africa.

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U.S. Energy Policy: We Don’t Need One

By Kenneth Costello -- June 27, 2019

“Probably more than anything, the legacy of past energy policies is advancing special interests – the energy industry, climate activists and environmentalists, governmental activists, and others – rather than the general public.”  

“Why then do we even need an energy policy? After all, we don’t have a computer policy, a clothes policy, or a food policy. Experience has shown that the country would be better off without one.”

The Green New Deal is just the latest in the long line of despicable energy policies proposed or implemented in the U.S. One has to go back to the 1970s (when I first entered the energy-policy debate) to find energy thinking this far off the track.

Why the demand for aggressive governmental intervention given its counterproductive promise and results (supply/demand distortions from mispricing; subsidies; unintended consequences).

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Waste-to-Energy: Air Pollution Renewable in Decline

By Kennedy Maize -- June 26, 2019
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Utility ‘Demand Side Management’ Programs: Time to Go Voluntary (RSM brief to Georgia PSC)

By Jim Clarkson -- June 25, 2019
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CO2 for Enhanced Oil Recovery (a market niche)

By Robert Bradley Jr. -- June 24, 2019
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China’s Coal Bi-Polarity Expedites the Death of the Paris Agreement

By Vijay Jayaraj -- June 20, 2019
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George Shultz’s Climate Activism: A Note

By Robert Bradley Jr. -- June 19, 2019
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Apocalypse Now? (review of Greer’s ‘Collapse Now and Avoid the Rush’)

By -- June 18, 2019
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Energy & Environmental Newsletter: June 17, 2019

By -- June 17, 2019
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